Freemasonry and Masonic rituals - Unveiling the Secrets

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Freemasonry and Masonic rituals - Unveiling the Secrets

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I`m quite interested to know more of what is going on in secret societies so this thread is dedicated to unveiling and understanding Freemasonry. But what is really Freemasonry and what is the purpose of these organizations?

Modern Freemasonry claims to be independent organizations, but that are interconnected with other lodges where each has its own specific principles and laws, but where they share the basic principles as that is fundamental to Freemasonry. Each of these organizations is called a lodge. The different lodges may each have their own views on religion, where, for example, in the Scandinavian countries it is required that one is a Christian, in other lodges it is irrelevant what faith you must have to be part of the organization. In many countries in the Middle East, Freemasonry is banned, but in Turkey and Morocco, which have established Grand Logdes and Malaysia and Lebanon affiliated with these, one can swear by Islam. The requirement for being consecrated to Freemasonry is in most lodges that you are a man, of legal age, can be 18, but preferably over 24 years, free behavior, good enough finances so that membership does not become an economic burden for oneself or the family and last but not least at least - that one believes in a creator / God. Some lodges have with the exception accepted atheism, but this is very controversial and not always popular among the other lodge members. The Masonic lodge stands in the main for a fraternity where one increases in the ranks after spiritual rituals and the sowing of the Masonic doctrine. In total, there are 33 publicly known degrees.
A Freemason's most important tasks are said to be faith, charity and helping and supporting the fraternity. Freemasonry is not a secret organization, but it is an organization with secrets. When one enters the fraternity, the initiate, by his faith (Christianity / Judaism / Bible, Islam / Koran or other religion) swears by the secrecy of everything that is said and done during the meetings in his respective lodge affiliation. This includes meetings, rituals and teachings. In most lodges, the family / spouse can or should know that the individual is a member of the lodge without this meaning a breach of the oath that is being kept secret. Being a member of the Masonic lodge does not have to be kept secret.
Modern Freemasonry was established in the 18th century and the public date is set for June 24, 1717 when four lodges merged into one major in England, the Premier Grand Lodge of England. The Grand Lodge of Ireland was established in 1725 and the Grand Lodge of Scotland in 1736. Freemasonry became particularly popular in America and the first American Masonic lodge was officially established in 1733 in Boston. Sources point out that the first Freemason in the United States was John Skene, originally from Scotland who then traveled to Burlington from New Jersey in 1682.
The American Lodge had a great influence on the American Revolution and a number of the founding fathers including George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Paul Revere, and Joseph Warren were well-known Freemasons. Benjamin Franklin was one of the leaders of the Pennsylvania Brotherhood.
Freemasonry organizations have several times had to acquire a low profile, due to persecution, also in recent times, not least during World War II.
Freemasonry is said to have its roots back to ancient Egypt, which can be recognized through their symbolism and rituals. At the same time, modern Freemasons claim that their origins have a biblical connection to the Temple of Solomon and later to the Knights Templar. This is logical since the Abrahamic religions can trace their roots back to ancient Egypt.

However there are many rituals known and unknown to the public so sharing information is the goal here.

I want to look further into the topic so we can unveil the secrets of a society of secrets

And many thanks for the replies in a previous thread, Masonic Childhood Experience:
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Re: Freemasonry and Masonic rituals - Unveiling the Secrets

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A brief official history of modern Freemasonry:

"Freemasonry or Masonry consists of fraternal organizations that trace their origins to the local fraternities of stonemasons that from the end of the fourteenth century regulated the qualifications of stonemasons and their interaction with authorities and clients.

Modern Freemasonry broadly consists of two main recognition groups.

Regular Freemasonry insists that a volume of scripture be open in a working lodge, that every member profess belief in a Supreme Being, that no women be admitted (although, in some jurisdictions, those who transition to women after being initiated may stay; see below), and that the discussion of religion and politics be banned.

Continental Freemasonry is now the general term for the jurisdictions which have removed some, or all, of these restrictions.

Freemasonry has been subject to numerous conspiracy theories throughout the years.

The basic, local organisational unit of Freemasonry is the Lodge. These private Lodges are usually supervised at the regional level (usually coterminous with either a state, province, or national border) by a Grand Lodge or Grand Orient. There is no international, worldwide Grand Lodge that supervises all of Freemasonry; each Grand Lodge is independent, and they do not necessarily recognise each other as being legitimate.

The degrees of Freemasonry retain the three grades of medieval craft guilds, those of Apprentice, Journeyman or fellow (now called Fellowcraft), and Master Mason. The candidate of these three degrees is progressively taught the meanings of the symbols of Freemasonry, and entrusted with grips, signs and words to signify to other members that he has been so initiated. The degrees are part allegorical morality play and part lecture. Three degrees are offered by Craft (or Blue Lodge) Freemasonry, and members of any of these degrees are known as Freemasons or Masons. There are additional degrees, which vary with locality and jurisdiction, and are usually administered by their own bodies (separate from those who administer the Craft degrees).

The Masonic lodge is the basic organisational unit of Freemasonry. The Lodge meets regularly to conduct the usual formal business of any small organisation (pay bills, organise social and charitable events, elect new members, etc.). In addition to business, the meeting may perform a ceremony to confer a Masonic degree or receive a lecture, which is usually on some aspect of Masonic history or ritual. At the conclusion of the meeting, the Lodge might adjourn for a formal dinner, or festive board, sometimes involving toasting and song.
The Masonic Square and Compasses. (Found with or without the letter G)

The bulk of Masonic ritual consists of degree ceremonies. Candidates for Freemasonry are progressively initiated into Freemasonry, first in the degree of Entered Apprentice. Some time later, in a separate ceremony, they will be passed to the degree of Fellowcraft, and finally they will be raised to the degree of Master Mason. In all of these ceremonies, the candidate is first obligated, then entrusted with passwords, signs and grips (secret handshakes) peculiar to his new rank. Another ceremony is the annual installation of the Master and officers of the Lodge. In some jurisdictions Installed Master is valued as a separate rank, with its own secrets to distinguish its members. In other jurisdictions, the grade is not recognised, and no inner ceremony conveys new secrets during the installation of a new Master of the Lodge.

Most Lodges have some sort of social calendar, allowing Masons and their partners to meet in a less ritualised environment. Often coupled with these events is the obligation placed on every Mason to contribute to charity. This occurs at both Lodge and Grand Lodge level. Masonic charities contribute to many fields, such as education or disaster relief.

These private local Lodges form the backbone of Freemasonry, and a Freemason will necessarily have been initiated into one of these. There also exist specialist Lodges where Masons meet to celebrate events, such as sport or Masonic research. The rank of Master Mason also entitles a Freemason to explore Masonry further through other degrees, administered separately from the Craft, or “Blue Lodge” degrees described here, but having a similar format to their meetings.

There is very little consistency in Freemasonry. Because each Masonic jurisdiction is independent, each sets its own procedures. The wording of the ritual, the number of officers present, the layout of the meeting room, etc. varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

The officers of the Lodge are elected or appointed annually. Every Masonic Lodge has a Master, two Wardens, a secretary and a treasurer. There is also a Tyler, or outer guard, who is always present outside the door of a working Lodge, to secure its privacy. Other offices vary between jurisdictions.

Each Masonic Lodge exists and operates according to a set of ancient principles known as the Landmarks of Freemasonry. These principles have thus far eluded any universally accepted definition.

Joining a lodge:

Candidates for Freemasonry will have met most active members of the Lodge they are joining before they are initiated. The process varies between jurisdictions, but the candidate will typically have been introduced by a friend at a Lodge social function, or at some form of open evening in the Lodge. In modern times, interested people often track down a local Lodge through the Internet. The onus is on candidates to ask to join; while candidates may be encouraged to ask, they are never invited. Once the initial inquiry is made, an interview usually follows to determine the candidate’s suitability. If the candidate decides to proceed from here, the Lodge ballots on the application before he (or she, depending on the Masonic Jurisdiction) can be accepted.

The absolute minimum requirement of any body of Freemasons is that the candidate must be free, and considered to be of good character. There is usually an age requirement, varying greatly between Grand Lodges, and (in some jurisdictions) capable of being overridden by a dispensation from the Grand Lodge. The underlying assumption is that the candidate should be a mature adult.

Additionally, most Grand Lodges require the candidate to declare a belief in a Supreme Being. In a few cases, the candidate may be required to be of a specific religion. The form of Freemasonry most common in Scandinavia (known as the Swedish Rite), for example, accepts only Christians.At the other end of the spectrum, “Liberal” or Continental Freemasonry, exemplified by the Grand Orient de France, does not require a declaration of belief in any deity, and accepts atheists (a cause of discord with the rest of Freemasonry).

During the ceremony of initiation, the candidate is expected to undertake or swear (usually on a volume of sacred text appropriate to his personal religious faith) to fulfil certain obligations as a Mason. In the course of three degrees, new masons will promise to keep the secrets of their degree from lower degrees and outsiders, and to support a fellow Mason in distress (as far as practicality and the law permit). There is instruction as to the duties of a Freemason, but on the whole, Freemasons are left to explore the craft in the manner they find most satisfying. Some will simply enjoy the dramatics or the management and administration of the lodge, others will further explore the ritual and symbolism of the craft, others will focus their involvement on their Lodge’s social side, perhaps in association with other lodges, while still others will concentrate on the charitable functions of the lodge.

Grand Lodges and Grand Orients are independent and sovereign bodies that govern Masonry in a given country, state, or geographical area (termed a jurisdiction). There is no single overarching governing body that presides over worldwide Freemasonry; connections between different jurisdictions depend solely on mutual recognition.

Freemasonry, as it exists in various forms all over the world, has a membership estimated by the United Grand Lodge of England at around 6 million worldwide. The fraternity is administratively organised into independent Grand Lodges (or sometimes Grand Orients), each of which governs its own Masonic jurisdiction, which consists of subordinate (or constituent) Lodges. The largest single jurisdiction, in terms of membership, is the United Grand Lodge of England (with a membership estimated at around a quarter million). The Grand Lodge of Scotland and Grand Lodge of Ireland (taken together) have approximately 150,000 members. In the United States, total membership is just under 2 million.
Recognition, amity and regularity

Relations between Grand Lodges are determined by the concept of Recognition. Each Grand Lodge maintains a list of other Grand Lodges that it recognises. When two Grand Lodges recognise and are in Masonic communication with each other, they are said to be in amity, and the brethren of each may visit each other’s Lodges and interact Masonically. When two Grand Lodges are not in amity, inter-visitation is not allowed. There are many reasons one Grand Lodge will withhold or withdraw recognition from another, but the two most common are Exclusive Jurisdiction and Regularity.

Exclusive Jurisdiction:

Exclusive Jurisdiction is a concept whereby normally only one Grand Lodge will be recognised in any geographical area. If two Grand Lodges claim jurisdiction over the same area, the other Grand Lodges will have to choose between them, and they may not all decide to recognise the same one. (In 1849, for example, the Grand Lodge of New York split into two rival factions, each claiming to be the legitimate Grand Lodge. Other Grand Lodges had to choose between them until the schism was healed.) Exclusive Jurisdiction can be waived when the two overlapping Grand Lodges are themselves in Amity and agree to share jurisdiction (for example, since the Grand Lodge of Connecticut is in Amity with the Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Connecticut, the principle of Exclusive Jurisdiction does not apply, and other Grand Lodges may recognise both, likewise the five distinct kinds of lodges in Germany have nominally united under one Grand Lodge, in order to obtain international recognition.

Regularity:

Regularity is a concept based on adherence to Masonic Landmarks, the basic membership requirements, tenets and rituals of the craft. Each Grand Lodge sets its own definition of what these landmarks are, and thus what is Regular and what is Irregular (and the definitions do not necessarily agree between Grand Lodges). Essentially, every Grand Lodge will hold that its landmarks (its requirements, tenets and rituals) are Regular, and judge other Grand Lodges based on those. If the differences are significant, one Grand Lodge may declare the other “Irregular” and withdraw or withhold recognition.

The most commonly shared rules for Recognition (based on Regularity) are those given by the United Grand Lodge of England in 1929:

The Grand Lodge should be established by an existing regular Grand Lodge, or by at least three regular Lodges.
A belief in a supreme being and scripture is a condition of membership.
Initiates should take their vows on that scripture.
Only men can be admitted, and no relationship exists with mixed Lodges.
The Grand Lodge has complete control over the first three degrees, and is not subject to another body.
All Lodges shall display a volume of scripture with the square and compasses while in session.
There is no discussion of politics or religion.
“Ancient landmarks, customs and usages” observed.

Blue Lodge (a term not used in the United Kingdom, which simply refers to the Craft) basic Freemasonry offers only three traditional degrees and, in most jurisdictions, the rank of past or installed master. Master Masons are also able to extend their Masonic experience by taking further degrees, in appendant or other bodies whether or not approved by their own Grand Lodge.

The Antient and Accepted Scottish Rite is a system of 33 degrees (including the three Blue Lodge degrees) administered by a local or national Supreme Council. This system is popular in North America, South America and in Continental Europe. In America, the York Rite, with a similar range, administers three orders of Masonry, namely the Royal Arch, Cryptic Masonry, and Knights Templar.

In Britain, separate bodies administer each order. Freemasons are encouraged to join the Holy Royal Arch, which is linked to Mark Masonry in Scotland and Ireland, but completely separate in England. In England, the Royal Arch is closely associated with the Craft, automatically having many Grand Officers in common, including H.R.H the Duke of Kent as both Grand Master of the Craft and First Grand Principal of the Royal Arch. The English Knights Templar and Cryptic Masonry share the Mark Grand Lodge offices and staff at Mark Masons Hall.

In the Nordic countries, the Swedish Rite is dominant; a variation of it is also used in parts of Germany.

Ritual and symbolism:

Freemasonry describes itself as a “‘beautiful system of morality, veiled in allegory and illustrated by symbols”. The symbolism is mainly, but not exclusively, drawn from the tools of stonemasons – the square and compasses, the level and plumb rule, the trowel, the rough and smooth ashlars, among others. Moral lessons are attributed to each of these tools, although the assignment is by no means consistent. The meaning of the symbolism is taught and explored through ritual, and in lectures and articles by individual masons who offer their personal insights and opinions.

All Freemasons begin their journey in the “craft” by being progressively “initiated”, “passed” and “raised” into the three degrees of Craft, or Blue Lodge Masonry. During these three rituals, the candidate is progressively taught the Masonic symbols, and entrusted with grips or tokens, signs and words to signify to other Masons which degrees he has taken. The dramatic allegorical ceremonies include explanatory lectures, and revolve around the construction of the Temple of Solomon, and the artistry and death of the chief architect, Hiram Abiff. The degrees are those of “Entered apprentice”, “Fellowcraft” and “Master Mason”. While many different versions of these rituals exist, with various lodge layouts and versions of the Hiramic legend, each version is recognisable to any Freemason from any jurisdiction.

In some jurisdictions, the main themes of each degree are illustrated by tracing boards. These painted depictions of Masonic themes are exhibited in the lodge according to which degree is being worked, and are explained to the candidate to illustrate the legend and symbolism of each degree.

The idea of Masonic brotherhood probably descends from a 16th-century legal definition of a “brother” as one who has taken an oath of mutual support to another. Accordingly, Masons swear at each degree to keep the contents of that degree secret, and to support and protect their brethren unless they have broken the law. In most Lodges the oath or obligation is taken on a Volume of Sacred Law, whichever book of divine revelation is appropriate to the religious beliefs of the individual brother (usually the Bible in the Anglo-American tradition). In Progressive continental Freemasonry, books other than scripture are permissible, a cause of rupture between Grand Lodges.

Origins:

Since the middle of the 19th century, Masonic historians have sought the origins of the movement in a series of similar documents known as the Old Charges, dating from the Regius Poem in about 1425 to the beginning of the 18th century. Alluding to the membership of a lodge of operative masons, they relate it to a mythologised history of the craft, the duties of its grades, and the manner in which oaths of fidelity are to be taken on joining. The 15th century also sees the first evidence of ceremonial regalia.

There is no clear mechanism by which these local trade organisations became today’s Masonic Lodges. The earliest rituals and passwords known, from operative lodges around the turn of the 17th–18th centuries, show continuity with the rituals developed in the later 18th century by accepted or speculative Masons, as those members who did not practice the physical craft gradually came to be known. The minutes of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary’s Chapel) No. 1 in Scotland show a continuity from an operative lodge in 1598 to a modern speculative Lodge. It is reputed to be the oldest Masonic Lodge in the world.

Alternatively, Thomas De Quincey in his work titled; Rosicrucians and Freemasonry, put forward the theory which suggested that Freemasonry was possibly an outgrowth of Rosicrucianism. The theory had also been postulated in 1803 by German professor; J. G. Buhle.
Freemasons' Hall, London, c. 1809

Freemasons’ Hall, London, c. 1809:

The first Grand Lodge, the Grand Lodge of London and Westminster (later called the Grand Lodge of England (GLE)), was founded on St John’s Day, 24 June 1717, when four existing London Lodges met for a joint dinner. Many English Lodges joined the new regulatory body, which itself entered a period of self-publicity and expansion. However, many Lodges could not endorse changes which some Lodges of the GLE made to the ritual (they came to be known as the Moderns), and a few of these formed a rival Grand Lodge on 17 July 1751, which they called the “Antient Grand Lodge of England.” These two Grand Lodges vied for supremacy until the Moderns promised to return to the ancient ritual. They united on 27 December 1813 to form the United Grand Lodge of England (UGLE).

The Grand Lodge of Ireland and the Grand Lodge of Scotland were formed in 1725 and 1736 respectively, although neither persuaded all of the existing lodges in their countries to join for many years.

North America:

The earliest known American lodges were in Pennsylvania. The Collector for the port of Pennsylvania, John Moore, wrote of attending lodges there in 1715, two years before the putative formation of the first Grand Lodge in London. The Premier Grand Lodge of England appointed a Provincial Grand Master for North America in 1731, based in Pennsylvania, leading to the creation of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania.

In present-day Canada, Erasmus James Philipps became a Freemason while working on a commission to resolve boundaries in New England and, in 1739, became provincial grand master for Nova Scotia; Philipps founded the first Masonic lodge in Canada at Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia.

Other lodges in the colony of Pennsylvania obtained authorisations from the later Antient Grand Lodge of England, the Grand Lodge of Scotland, and the Grand Lodge of Ireland, which was particularly well represented in the travelling lodges of the British Army. Many lodges came into existence with no warrant from any Grand Lodge, applying and paying for their authorisation only after they were confident of their own survival.

After the American Revolution, independent U.S. Grand Lodges developed within each state. Some thought was briefly given to organising an overarching “Grand Lodge of the United States,” with George Washington (who was a member of a Virginian lodge) as the first Grand Master, but the idea was short-lived. The various state Grand Lodges did not wish to diminish their own authority by agreeing to such a body.
Jamaican Freemasonry

Freemasonry was imported to Jamaica by British immigrants who colonized the island for over 300 years. In 1908, there were eleven recorded Masonic Lodges which included three Grand Lodges, two Craft Lodges, and two Rose Croix Chapters. During slavery, the Lodges were open to all “freeborn” men. According to the Jamaican 1834 census, that potentially included 5,000 free black men and 40,000 free coloureds (mixed-race). After the full abolition of slavery in 1838, the Lodges were open to all Jamaican men of any race. Jamaica also kept close relationships with Masons from other countries. Jamaican Freemasonry historian Jackie Ranston, noted that:

Jamaica served as an arms depot for the revolutionary forces when two Kingston Freemasons, Wellwood and Maxwell Hyslop, financed the campaigns of SimÛn BolÌvar, the Liberator, to whom six Latin American Republics owe their independence”. BolÌvar himself was a Mason, enjoying contacts with Brethren in Spain, England, France, and Venezuela until after gaining power in Venezuela, he prohibited all secret societies in 1828 and included the Freemasons.

On 25 May 2017, Masons around the world celebrated the 300th anniversary of the fraternity. Jamaica hosted one of the regional gatherings for this celebration.
Prince Hall Freemasonry:

Prince Hall Freemasonry exists because of the refusal of early American lodges to admit African Americans. In 1775, an African American named Prince Hall, along with 14 other African-American men, was initiated into a British military lodge with a warrant from the Grand Lodge of Ireland, having failed to obtain admission from the other lodges in Boston. When the British military Lodge left North America after the end of the Revolution, those 15 men were given the authority to meet as a Lodge, but not to initiate Masons. In 1784, these individuals obtained a Warrant from the Premier Grand Lodge of England (GLE) and formed African Lodge, Number 459. When the UGLE was formed in 1813, all U.S.-based Lodges were stricken from their rolls – due largely to the War of 1812. Thus, separated from both UGLE and any concordantly recognised U.S. Grand Lodge, African Lodge retitled itself as the African Lodge, Number 1 – and became a de facto Grand Lodge. (This lodge is not to be confused with the various Grand Lodges in Africa.) As with the rest of U.S. Freemasonry, Prince Hall Freemasonry soon grew and organised on a Grand Lodge system for each state.

Widespread racial segregation in 19th- and early 20th-century North America made it difficult for African Americans to join Lodges outside of Prince Hall jurisdictions – and impossible for inter-jurisdiction recognition between the parallel U.S. Masonic authorities. By the 1980s, such discrimination was a thing of the past. Today most U.S. Grand Lodges recognise their Prince Hall counterparts, and the authorities of both traditions are working towards full recognition. The United Grand Lodge of England has no problem with recognising Prince Hall Grand Lodges. While celebrating their heritage as lodges of black Americans, Prince Hall is open to all men regardless of race or religion.
Emergence of Continental Freemasonry

Masonic initiation, Paris, 1745:

English Freemasonry spread to France in the 1720s, first as lodges of expatriates and exiled Jacobites, and then as distinctively French lodges which still follow the ritual of the Moderns. From France and England, Freemasonry spread to most of Continental Europe during the course of the 18th century. The Grande Loge de France formed under the Grand Mastership of the Duke of Clermont, who exercised only nominal authority. His successor, the Duke of Orléans, reconstituted the central body as the Grand Orient de France in 1773. Briefly eclipsed during the French Revolution, French Freemasonry continued to grow in the next century, at first under the leadership of Alexandre Francois Auguste de Grasse, Comte de Grassy-Tilly. A career Army officer, he had lived with his family in Charleston, South Carolina from 1793 to the early 1800s, after leaving Saint-Domingue (now Haiti) during the years of the Haitian Revolution.
Schism

The ritual form on which the Grand Orient of France was based was abolished in England in the events leading to the formation of the United Grand Lodge of England in 1813. However the two jurisdictions continued in amity (mutual recognition) until events of the 1860s and 1870s drove a seemingly permanent wedge between them. In 1868 the Supreme Council of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of the State of Louisiana appeared in the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Louisiana, recognised by the Grand Orient de France, but regarded by the older body as an invasion of their jurisdiction. The new Scottish Rite body admitted blacks. The resolution of the Grand Orient the following year that neither colour, race, nor religion could disqualify a man from Masonry prompted the Grand Lodge to withdraw recognition, and it persuaded other American Grand Lodges to do the same.

A dispute during the Lausanne Congress of Supreme Councils of 1875 prompted the Grand Orient de France to commission a report by a Protestant pastor which concluded that, as Freemasonry was not a religion, it should not require a religious belief. The new constitutions read, “Its principles are absolute liberty of conscience and human solidarity”, the existence of God and the immortality of the soul being struck out. It is possible that the immediate objections of the United Grand Lodge of England were at least partly motivated by the political tension between France and Britain at the time. The result was the withdrawal of recognition of the Grand Orient of France by the United Grand Lodge of England, a situation that continues today.

Not all French lodges agreed with the new wording. In 1894, lodges favouring the compulsory recognition of the Great Architect of the Universe formed the Grande Loge de France. In 1913, the United Grand Lodge of England recognised a new Grand Lodge of Regular Freemasons, a Grand Lodge that follows a similar rite to Anglo-American Freemasonry with a mandatory belief in a deity.

There are now three strands of Freemasonry in France, which extend into the rest of Continental Europe:-

Liberal (also adogmatic or progressive) – Principles of liberty of conscience, and laicity, particularly the separation of the Church and State.
Traditional – Old French ritual with a requirement for a belief in a Supreme Being. (This strand is typified by the Grande Loge de France).
Regular – Standard Anglo-American ritual, mandatory belief in Supreme Being

The term Continental Freemasonry was used in Mackey’s 1873 Encyclopedia of Freemasonry to “designate the Lodges on the Continent of Europe which retain many usages which have either been abandoned by, or never were observed in, the Lodges of England, Ireland, and Scotland, as well as the United States of America”. Today, it is frequently used to refer to only the Liberal jurisdictions typified by the Grand Orient de France.

The majority of Freemasonry considers the Liberal (Continental) strand to be Irregular, and thus withhold recognition. For the Continental lodges, however, having a different approach to Freemasonry was not a reason for severing masonic ties. In 1961, an umbrella organisation, Centre de Liaison et d’Information des Puissances maçonniques Signataires de l’Appel de Strasbourg (CLIPSAS) was set up, which today provides a forum for most of these Grand Lodges and Grand Orients worldwide. Included in the list of over 70 Grand Lodges and Grand Orients are representatives of all three of the above categories, including mixed and women’s organisations. The United Grand Lodge of England does not communicate with any of these jurisdictions, and expects its allies to follow suit. This creates the distinction between Anglo-American and Continental Freemasonry.
Italy

In the early 20th century Freemasonry was an influential semi-secret force in Italian politics with a strong presence among professionals and the middle class across Italy, as well as among the leadership of the parliament, public administration, and the army. The two main organisation were the Grand Orient and the Grand Lodge of Italy. They had 25,000 members in 500 or more lodges. Freemasons took on the challenge of mobilizing the press, public opinion and the leading political parties in support of Italy’s joining the Allies of the First World War in 1914–1915. Traditionally, they promoted Italian nationalism focused on unification, and undermining the power of the Catholic Church. In 1914-15 they dropped the traditional pacifistic rhetoric and used instead the powerful language of Italian nationalism. Freemasonry had always promoted cosmopolitan universal values, and by 1917 onwards they demanded a League of Nations to promote a new post-war universal order based upon the peaceful coexistence of independent and democratic nations.
Freemasonry and women
Main articles: Freemasonry and women and Co-Freemasonry

The status of women in the old guilds and corporations of medieval masons remains uncertain. The principle of “femme sole” allowed a widow to continue the trade of her husband, but its application had wide local variations, such as full membership of a trade body or limited trade by deputation or approved members of that body. In masonry, the small available evidence points to the less empowered end of the scale.

At the dawn of the Grand Lodge era, during the 1720s, James Anderson composed the first printed constitutions for Freemasons, the basis for most subsequent constitutions, which specifically excluded women from Freemasonry. As Freemasonry spread, continental masons began to include their ladies in Lodges of Adoption, which worked three degrees with the same names as the men’s but different content. The French officially abandoned the experiment in the early 19th century. Later organisations with a similar aim emerged in the United States, but distinguished the names of the degrees from those of male masonry.

Maria Deraismes was initiated into Freemasonry in 1882, then resigned to allow her lodge to rejoin their Grand Lodge. Having failed to achieve acceptance from any masonic governing body, she and Georges Martin started a mixed masonic lodge that worked masonic ritual. Annie Besant spread the phenomenon to the English-speaking world. Disagreements over ritual led to the formation of exclusively female bodies of Freemasons in England, which spread to other countries. Meanwhile, the French had re-invented Adoption as an all-female lodge in 1901, only to cast it aside again in 1935. The lodges, however, continued to meet, which gave rise, in 1959, to a body of women practising continental Freemasonry.

In general, Continental Freemasonry is sympathetic to Freemasonry amongst women, dating from the 1890s when French lodges assisted the emergent co-masonic movement by promoting enough of their members to the 33rd degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite to allow them, in 1899, to form their own grand council, recognised by the other Continental Grand Councils of that Rite. The United Grand Lodge of England issued a statement in 1999 recognising the two women’s grand lodges there to be regular in all but the participants. While they were not, therefore, recognised as regular, they were part of Freemasonry “in general”. The attitude of most regular Anglo-American grand lodges remains that women Freemasons are not legitimate Masons.

In 2018 guidance was released by the United Grand Lodge of England stating that, in regard to transgender women, “A Freemason who after initiation ceases to be a man does not cease to be a Freemason”. The guidance also states that transgender men are allowed to apply to become Freemasons.

Anti-Masonry:

Anti-Masonry (alternatively called Anti-Freemasonry) has been defined as “opposition to Freemasonry”, but there is no homogeneous anti-Masonic movement. Anti-Masonry consists of widely differing criticisms from diverse (and often incompatible) groups who are hostile to Freemasonry in some form. Critics have included religious groups, political groups, and conspiracy theorists, in particular, those espousing Masonic conspiracy theories or the Judeo-Masonic conspiracy theory. Certain prominent Anti-Masons, such as Nesta Helen Webster (1876 – 1960), have exclusively criticized “Continental Masonry” while considering “Regular Masonry” an honorable association.

There have been many disclosures and exposés dating as far back as the 18th century. These often lack context, may be outdated for various reasons, or could be outright hoaxes on the part of the author, as in the case of the Taxil hoax.

These hoaxes and exposés have often become the basis for criticism of Masonry, often religious or political in nature or are based on suspicion of corrupt conspiracy of some form. The political opposition that arose after the American “Morgan Affair” in 1826 gave rise to the term Anti-Masonry, which is still in use in America today, both by Masons in referring to their critics and as a self-descriptor by the critics themselves.
Religious opposition

Freemasonry has attracted criticism from theocratic states and organised religions for supposed competition with religion, or supposed heterodoxy within the fraternity itself and has long been the target of conspiracy theories, which assert Freemasonry to be an occult and evil power.
Christianity and Freemasonry
Main article: Opposition to Freemasonry within Christianity

Although members of various faiths cite objections, certain Christian denominations have had high-profile negative attitudes to Masonry, banning or discouraging their members from being Freemasons.

The denomination with the longest history of objection to Freemasonry is the Catholic Church. The objections raised by the Catholic Church are based on the allegation that Masonry teaches a naturalistic deistic religion which is in conflict with Church doctrine. A number of Papal pronouncements have been issued against Freemasonry. The first was Pope Clement XII’s In eminenti apostolatus, 28 April 1738; the most recent was Pope Leo XIII’s Ab apostolici, 15 October 1890. The 1917 Code of Canon Law explicitly declared that joining Freemasonry entailed automatic excommunication, and banned books favouring Freemasonry.

In 1983, the Church issued a new code of canon law. Unlike its predecessor, the 1983 Code of Canon Law did not explicitly name Masonic orders among the secret societies it condemns. It states: “A person who joins an association which plots against the Church is to be punished with a just penalty; one who promotes or takes office in such an association is to be punished with an interdict.” This named omission of Masonic orders caused both Catholics and Freemasons to believe that the ban on Catholics becoming Freemasons may have been lifted, especially after the perceived liberalisation of Vatican II. However, the matter was clarified when Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger (later Pope Benedict XVI), as the Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, issued a Declaration on Masonic Associations, which states: “… the Church’s negative judgment in regard to Masonic association remains unchanged since their principles have always been considered irreconcilable with the doctrine of the Church and therefore membership in them remains forbidden. The faithful who enrol in Masonic associations are in a state of grave sin and may not receive Holy Communion.” For its part, Freemasonry has never objected to Catholics joining their fraternity. Those Grand Lodges in amity with UGLE deny the Church’s claims. The UGLE now states that “Freemasonry does not seek to replace a Mason’s religion or provide a substitute for it.”

In contrast to Catholic allegations of rationalism and naturalism, Protestant objections are more likely to be based on allegations of mysticism, occultism, and even Satanism. Masonic scholar Albert Pike is often quoted (in some cases misquoted) by Protestant anti-Masons as an authority for the position of Masonry on these issues. However, Pike, although undoubtedly learned, was not a spokesman for Freemasonry and was also controversial among Freemasons in general. His writings represented his personal opinion only, and furthermore an opinion grounded in the attitudes and understandings of late 19th century Southern Freemasonry of the US. Notably, his book carries in the preface a form of disclaimer from his own Grand Lodge. No one voice has ever spoken for the whole of Freemasonry.

Free Methodist Church founder B.T. Roberts was a vocal opponent of Freemasonry in the mid 19th century. Roberts opposed the society on moral grounds and stated, “The god of the lodge is not the God of the Bible.” Roberts believed Freemasonry was a “mystery” or “alternate” religion and encouraged his church not to support ministers who were Freemasons. Freedom from secret societies is one of the “frees” upon which the Free Methodist Church was founded.

Since the founding of Freemasonry, many Bishops of the Church of England have been Freemasons, such as Archbishop Geoffrey Fisher. In the past, few members of the Church of England would have seen any incongruity in concurrently adhering to Anglican Christianity and practising Freemasonry. In recent decades, however, reservations about Freemasonry have increased within Anglicanism, perhaps due to the increasing prominence of the evangelical wing of the church. The former Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, appeared to harbour some reservations about Masonic ritual, whilst being anxious to avoid causing offence to Freemasons inside and outside the Church of England. In 2003 he felt it necessary to apologise to British Freemasons after he said that their beliefs were incompatible with Christianity and that he had barred the appointment of Freemasons to senior posts in his diocese when he was Bishop of Monmouth.

In 1933, the Orthodox Church of Greece officially declared that being a Freemason constitutes an act of apostasy and thus, until he repents, the person involved with Freemasonry cannot partake of the Eucharist. This has been generally affirmed throughout the whole Eastern Orthodox Church. The Orthodox critique of Freemasonry agrees with both the Catholic and Protestant versions: “Freemasonry cannot be at all compatible with Christianity as far as it is a secret organisation, acting and teaching in mystery and secret and deifying rationalism.”

Regular Freemasonry has traditionally not responded to these claims, beyond the often repeated statement that those Grand Lodges in amity with UGLE explicitly adhere to the principle that “Freemasonry is not a religion, nor a substitute for religion. There is no separate ‘Masonic deity,’ and there is no separate proper name for a deity in Freemasonry.”

Christian men, who were discouraged from joining the Freemasons by their Churches or who wanted a more religiocentric society, joined similar fraternal organisations, such as the Knights of Columbus for Catholic Christians, and the Loyal Orange Institution for Protestant Christians, although these fraternal organisations have been “organized in part on the style of and use many symbols of Freemasonry”.

Islam and Freemasonry:

Many Islamic anti-Masonic arguments are closely tied to both antisemitism and Anti-Zionism, though other criticisms are made such as linking Freemasonry to Al-Masih ad-Dajjal (the false Messiah in Islamic Scripture). Some Muslim anti-Masons argue that Freemasonry promotes the interests of the Jews around the world and that one of its aims is to destroy the Al-Aqsa Mosque in order to rebuild the Temple of Solomon in Jerusalem. In article 28 of its Covenant, Hamas states that Freemasonry, Rotary, and other similar groups “work in the interest of Zionism and according to its instructions …”

Many countries with a majority Muslim population do not allow Masonic establishments within their borders. However, countries such as Turkey and Morocco have established Grand Lodges, while in countries such as Malaysia and Lebanon there are District Grand Lodges operating under a warrant from an established Grand Lodge.

In Pakistan in 1972, Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, then Prime Minister of Pakistan, placed a ban on Freemasonry. Lodge buildings were confiscated by the government.

Masonic lodges existed in Iraq as early as 1917, when the first lodge under the United Grand Lodge of England (UGLE) was opened. Nine lodges under UGLE existed by the 1950s, and a Scottish lodge was formed in 1923. However, the position changed following the revolution, and all lodges were forced to close in 1965. This position was later reinforced under Saddam Hussein; the death penalty was “prescribed” for those who “promote or acclaim Zionist principles, including freemasonry, or who associate [themselves] with Zionist organisations.”

Political opposition:

In 1799, English Freemasonry almost came to a halt due to Parliamentary proclamation. In the wake of the French Revolution, the Unlawful Societies Act banned any meetings of groups that required their members to take an oath or obligation.

The Grand Masters of both the Moderns and the Antients Grand Lodges called on Prime Minister William Pitt (who was not a Freemason) and explained to him that Freemasonry was a supporter of the law and lawfully constituted authority and was much involved in charitable work. As a result, Freemasonry was specifically exempted from the terms of the Act, provided that each private lodge’s Secretary placed with the local “Clerk of the Peace” a list of the members of his lodge once a year. This continued until 1967, when the obligation of the provision was rescinded by Parliament.

Freemasonry in the United States faced political pressure following the 1826 kidnapping of William Morgan by Freemasons and his subsequent disappearance. Reports of the “Morgan Affair”, together with opposition to Jacksonian democracy (Andrew Jackson was a prominent Mason), helped fuel an Anti-Masonic movement. The short-lived Anti-Masonic Party was formed, which fielded candidates for the presidential elections of 1828 and 1832.

In Italy, Freemasonry has become linked to a scandal concerning the Propaganda Due lodge (a.k.a. P2). This lodge was chartered by the Grande Oriente d’Italia in 1877, as a lodge for visiting Masons unable to attend their own lodges. Under Licio Gelli’s leadership, in the late 1970s, P2 became involved in the financial scandals that nearly bankrupted the Vatican Bank. However, by this time the lodge was operating independently and irregularly, as the Grand Orient had revoked its charter and expelled Gelli in 1976.

Conspiracy theorists have long associated Freemasonry with the New World Order and the Illuminati, and state that Freemasonry as an organisation is either bent on world domination or already secretly in control of world politics. Historically Freemasonry has attracted criticism—and suppression—from both the politically far right (e.g., Nazi Germany) and the far left (e.g. the former Communist states in Eastern Europe).

Freemasonry is viewed with distrust even in some modern democracies. In the UK, Masons working in the justice system, such as judges and police officers, were from 1999 to 2009 required to disclose their membership. While a parliamentary inquiry found that there has been no evidence of wrongdoing, the government believed that Masons’ potential loyalties to support fellow Masons, should be transparent to the public. The policy of requiring a declaration of masonic membership by applicants for judicial office (judges and magistrates) was ended in 2009 by Justice Secretary Jack Straw (who had initiated the requirement in the 1990s). Straw stated that the rule was considered disproportionate, since no impropriety or malpractice had been shown as a result of judges being Freemasons.

Freemasonry is both successful and controversial in France. As of the early 21st century, membership is rising, but reporting in the popular media is often negative.

In some countries anti-Masonry is often related to antisemitism and anti-Zionism. For example, in 1980 the Iraqi legal and penal code was changed by Saddam Hussein’s ruling Ba’ath Party, making it a felony to “promote or acclaim Zionist principles, including Freemasonry, or who associate [themselves] with Zionist organisations”. Professor Andrew Prescott of the University of Sheffield writes: “Since at least the time of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, antisemitism has gone hand in hand with anti-masonry, so it is not surprising that allegations that 11 September was a Zionist plot have been accompanied by suggestions that the attacks were inspired by a masonic world order”.


The preserved records of the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (the Reich Security Main Office) show the persecution of Freemasons during the Holocaust. RSHA Amt VII (Written Records) was overseen by Professor Franz Six and was responsible for “ideological” tasks, by which was meant the creation of antisemitic and anti-Masonic propaganda. While the number of victims is not accurately known, historians estimate that between 80,000 and 200,000 Freemasons were killed under the Nazi regime. Masonic concentration camp inmates were classified as political prisoners and wore an inverted red triangle. Hitler believed Freemasons had succumbed to Jews conspiring against Germany.

The small blue forget-me-not flower was first used by the Grand Lodge Zur Sonne, in 1926, as a Masonic emblem at the annual convention in Bremen, Germany. In 1938 a forget-me-not badge—made by the same factory as the Masonic badge—was chosen for the annual Nazi Party Winterhilfswerk, the annual charity drive of the National Socialist People’s Welfare, the welfare branch of the Nazi party. This coincidence enabled Freemasons to wear the forget-me-not badge as a secret sign of membership.

After World War II, the forget-me-not flower was used again as a Masonic emblem in 1948 at the first Annual Convention of the United Grand Lodges of Germany in 1948. The badge is now worn in the coat lapel by Freemasons around the world to remember all who suffered in the name of Freemasonry, especially those during the Nazi era."

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Re: Freemasonry and Masonic rituals - Unveiling the Secrets

Post by bean »

Some Masonic Symbols explained in videos from Masonic Traveler

https://freemasoninformation.com/masonic-symbols/

Esoteric Freemasonry, Symbols & Symbolism:


Geometry in Freemasonry, Symbols and Symbolism:


Acacia, Freemason Information:


All-Seeing Eye, Freemason Information:


The Masonic Apron, Freemason Information:


Ashlar - Symbols & Symbolism:


The Beehive in Freemasonry, Symbols and Symbolism:


Broken Column, Symbols & Symbolism:


Brotherhood - Symbols & Symbolism:


Chamber of Reflection - Freemason Information:


Canopy of Heaven in Freemasonry, Freemason Information:


Faith in Freemasonry, Symbols and Symbolism:


Great Architect of the Universe, Freemason Information:


In Hoc Signo Vinces, Symbols and Symbolism:
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Re: Freemasonry and Masonic rituals - Unveiling the Secrets

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It’s hard if not impossible to find out the secrets of freemasonry.
The high level “initiated” masons lie to their low level brothers, who really don’t know what their “religion” is all about…

I´ve read a book by Paul Nadon, who tries to convince us that freemasonry is innocent, but when you think about it, it shows that freemasonry isn’t innocent at all (and the information in the book isn´t really that “secret”)...
I’m not sure whether the presented “history” is more factual of “speculative”, but it gave me a better understanding of freemasonry (which doesn’t mean much as I´m nothing near an expert on freemasonry).

According to Nadon, freemasonry in many ways is in imitation of the builders of Rome – masons, carpenters, builders and architects. He explains that these “masons” were in a hierarchical, secretive organisation.

Nadon also argues that freemasonry was founded on the foundation of the Knights Templars, after they were dissolved in 1312 (Templar knights went to Scotland to become freemasons).
According to Nadon, the English “freemason” is derived from “frank-mason” (because supposedly the subjects in the Kingdom of the Franks were “free”).

Nadon argues that freemasonry has always been close to the Christian Catholic church, while contradicting himself because workers joined the “Brotherhood” so they could become independent from the church. This also seems to contradict the fact that Jews were/are freemasons.
Nadon argues that people joined the “Brotherhood” so they could become independent from the Royal families, including tax exemption, while contradicting himself that Royals were often freemasons themselves or appointed the (Grand)masters of the masonic lodges.
The Grandmaster rank was often hierarchical.

What makes it all less than innocent...
First going back to the Roman masons, the most important buildings were places of worship and for armies. They were involved in building strong buildings for protection and offensive weapons as well, like catapults.

Nadon writes that modern freemasonry is “speculative”, instead of “operative” when masons were (only) involved in building activities.
When you combine this with the assualt on science, this “speculative” way of thinkering has actually taken over evidence-based science to destroy (genuine) science.

Freemasonry from its foundation in the 14th century was built on legal procedures, which means that every high level freemason is basically (also) a lawyer.
Freemasons have the obligation to follow orders from their hierarchical leaders and to help, give charity to their fellow brothers.
When these freemasons become judges, attorneys, and politicians (lawmakers) it becomes apparent that our legal system can and will be used against us.

Paul Nadon – The secret history of freemasonry; Its origins and connection to the Knights Templar (1991): https://books.google.nl/books?id=DGAoDw ... rs&f=false


Paul Nadon has also written that the 2 Saint John’s were/are patron saints of freemasonry – St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist.
Current day freemasonry came primarily from northern England and Scotland where the Saints John were common among the Stonemason Guilds.

See the Masonic depiction of St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist.
Image

Some argue that freemasonry is descended from the Druids and other ancient Celtic priesthoods of the sun and isn’t really about God, but all about worshipping the Sun. This is supported by the fact that the feast days for St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist are 24 June and 27 December respectively (just after the the summer and winter solstices, also note that the December celebration is one day after Christmas).

St. John the Baptist, was supposedly a cousin to Jesus Christ, who predicted the coming of the Messiah.
St. John the Baptist’s day, has been celebrated yearly by the Grand Lodge of England since 1717.

St. John the Evangelist is even more important as he is one of the 4 supposed writers of the New Testament. His yearly feast was instated some time after 1717.
In his Epistles, St. John the Evangelist supposedly describes how the Word and the Light are inevitably linked to each other and to Truth and Love.

In another freemasonic picture, the Point represents an individual brother and the Circle the boundary line of his duty. This Circle is embordered by 2 perpendicular parallel lines, representing St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist; upon the top rest the Holy Scriptures.
Image

The Saints John were also referred to in Templar records.
When the Templars were suppressed in 1307 many Knights Templar in England joined the Hospitallers: http://www.freemasons-freemasonry.com/ward.html
(http://archive.is/X0RNE)
The Order of the Garter rules the world: https://www.lawfulpath.com/forum/viewto ... 5549#p5549
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Re: Freemasonry and Masonic rituals - Unveiling the Secrets

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Eyes To See & Ears To Hear!

What They Don't Want You To Know

PeopleOftheway

Women Of Freemasonry - Exposing Mystery Babylon - Eyes 2 See & Ears 2 Hear!:
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So have a good time...

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Previous thread here: viewtopic.php?f=23&t=1687
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Re: Freemasonry and Masonic rituals - Unveiling the Secrets

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I'm a fan of the history lessons of the Lyndon LaRouche organisation.
In the following collection of essays, they argue that the Venetian Black Nobility hijacked the UK to conquer the world.

It specifically names the Venetian monk Paulo Sarpi as the founder of the Rosicrucian cult that later became Freemasonry.
First, Contarini's relative and neighbor Francesco Zorzi was sent to serve as sex adviser to Henry VIII, whose raging libido would be the key to Venetian hopes. Zorzi brought Rosicrucian mysticism and Freemasonry to a land [France] that Venetian bankers had been looting for centuries. The Venetian Party in England grew under the early Stuarts as Francis Bacon and his wife Thomas Hobbes imported the neo-Aristotelianism of Fra Paolo Sarpi, the great Venetian gamemaster of the early 1600s...

Paolo Sarpi was nominally a Servite monk who was exceptionally talented. Yet he was much more. He was the leading organizer of the Giovani. Out of the Giovani salons and secret society, Venice planned the destruction of Christianity in what was later to be called Freemasonry, which dominates England to this day Sarpi and Venice create the Rosicrucian cult of syncretic religion that becomes Freemasonry
.
The Palmerston Zoo; Solving the Paradox of Current World History: http://archive.is/kfFUw


The previous link really gives a plausible explanation for world history from the 16th century until this very day, which I've previously summarised here: https://www.lawfulpath.com/forum/viewto ... t=40#p6255
The Order of the Garter rules the world: https://www.lawfulpath.com/forum/viewto ... 5549#p5549
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Re: Freemasonry and Masonic rituals - Unveiling the Secrets

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This post is mostly about the origins of Freemasonry, founded in the 17th century, when Amsterdam was the opium and money centre of the "civilised" world.


In the 9th century, King Pepin of Italy, son of Charlemagne King of the Franks, tried unsuccessfully to conquer Charlemagne's enemy Venice.
This of course doesn't mean that Venice was still the enemy of the Carolingians in the 13th and following centuries, but that is apparently the conclusion of the Larouchians.

In the 13th century, the Venetians were at their top of military power and aimed to create a new Roman Empire with Venice at its centre . They expanded into the Italian mainland, Greek islands, and the Black Sea. They helped to defeat the Hohenstaufen rulers of Germany and Italy.
Venetian intelligence assisted Genghis Khan in his brutal campaign against powers that resisted Venice.
Later, after a series of wars Venice and Genoa joined forces.

The Venetian bankers (a.k.a. Lombards) looted Europe through usurious loans. In the years after 1255, Henry III of England became insolvent after getting Lombard loans at 120-180% interest to fight foreign wars . These loans started the Venetian Party in England.
When the Lombard bankers went bankrupt because the English didn't pay, a collapse of the European economy followed and the Black Plague that depopulated the continent. In the midst of the chaos, the Venetians encouraged their ally Edward III of England, to wage war against France (the Hundred Years War 1339-1453), and found the Most Noble Order of the Garter (around 1348).

While Venice had always been the enemies of science, Paolo Sarpi realised that the Venetians must now present themselves as the great champions of science, to seize control, corrupt and ultimately destroy the scientific community from the inside, through Aristotelian formalism and sense certainty.

Sarpi sponsored and directed the career of Galileo Galilei, who was used for a counterattack against the Platonic method of Johannes Kepler.
The supposed founder of Physics, Isaac Newton’s main interest was alchemy. His sources were kooks like Elias Ashmole, the Rosicrucian leader of British speculative Freemasonry: https://archive.schillerinstitute.com/f ... enice.html
(https://archive.is/cBNzl)


The following has more information on how the Venetians created Freemasonry in England.
In 1616, the Protestant-Anglican royal marriage of James I's daughter to the Elector of Palatine was the talk of England. For Venice, a significant counterweight to the Habsburgs.

Also in 1616, the first Rosicrucian tract - the "Fama'' - is written, calling for the formation of a Brotherhood of the Rosy Cross. It is not too distant from what Sarpi's friend, Francis Bacon, is calling for. Shortly thereafter, another Rosicrucian document - the "Confession'' - is published.
Both written in German and circulated in the territory of the Elector of Palatine.

This is followed by several other Rosicrucian documents, all claiming to have solved the riddle of the relationship between the microcosm and the macrocosm.
One of these books was written by Robert Fludd, who is attacked by Kepler as a mystic who uses numbers as a form of cabalistic symbolism.

The beginning of the Long Parliament and a series of meetings in England, in 1640, led to the creation of the British Royal Society. Robert Moray in Edinburgh in 1641 is the first recorded induction into the Freemasons, quickly followed by Elias Ashmole. Both Ashmole and Moray were founding members of the British Royal Society.
The other major explicitly Rosicrucian figure was Isaac Newton, who had copies of both the Fama and the Confessio in his library.

Historian Frances Yates quotes one De Quincey:
Freemasonry is neither more nor less than Rosicrucianism as modified by those who transplanted it in England, whence it was re-exported to the other countries of Europe.
.
An announcement for one of the Freemason meetings in 1676 reads:
To give notice that the Modern Green-ribboned Cabal, together with the ancient brotherhood of the Rosy Cross: the Hermetic Adepti and the company of Accepted Masons...
[url]https://american_almanac.tripod.com/venfreem.htm[/url]
(https://archive.is/oR6i)


The last is a much longer article, whose main value for me is that it doesn't come from LaRouche, and independently confirms the LaRouche information...

According to John Robinson, all of the original members of the Royal Society were Freemasons, with Rosicrucian elements.

Metaphorically Rosicrucians were Rose Cross men - men who used Bacon's discovery device (which has a compass design in the plays) to make the metaphoric voyage beyond the pillars of Hercules in search of the New World of the sciences.
Freemasonry society. In Bacon's time it was a true secret society.

The Temple of Solomon of Freemasonry is a model of the universe. The compass with the Rosicrucian rose is a metaphoric model of the world. Both are built into the First Folio, with its design of the 32 directions of the compass, and the 36 decans of the zodiac.
Image

The Rosicrucian Fraternity was designed as a metaphoric complement to the Freemason Society (or vice versa).
There is a close affinity with the New Atlantis - the land of the Rosicrucians: http://www.sirbacon.org/mcompeer2.htm
The Order of the Garter rules the world: https://www.lawfulpath.com/forum/viewto ... 5549#p5549
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Re: Freemasonry and Masonic rituals - Unveiling the Secrets

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It's strange that I made the last post in this thread, but the overview shows 30 December post as "the last"...

I have earlier posted about the following book. That I don't really recommend. It gives a good indication of what (lies) higher level, initiated masons tell their lower level brothers about the origins of freemasonry.

I found a freely viewable PDF version of the book.
Firestarter wrote: Wed Dec 09, 2020 3:17 pmPaul Nadon – The secret history of freemasonry; Its origins and connection to the Knights Templar (1991)
http://www.themasonictrowel.com/ebooks/ ... eb0215.pdf
(http://web.archive.org/web/201911261036 ... eb0215.pdf)
The Order of the Garter rules the world: https://www.lawfulpath.com/forum/viewto ... 5549#p5549
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Re: Freemasonry and Masonic rituals - Unveiling the Secrets

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In 1730 or 1731, Benjamin Franklin was initiated into the local Masonic lodge. Since then, Franklin in his articles for the Gazette praised Freemasonry in America. These writings are sometimes referred to as the beginning of Freemasonry in the USA.
Franklin remained a Freemason for the rest of his life.

See Benjamin Franklin pictured as a freemason (at the Loge des Neuf Soeurs in Paris?).
Image

In 1734, Benjamin Franklin became a grand master in Pennsylvania, and published the first Masonic book in the Americas (James Anderson's Constitutions of the Free-Masons).
From 1735 to 1738, Franklin was secretary of St. John's Lodge in Philadelphia.

In 1760, Benjamin Franklin was elected as Provincial Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of England.
When Franklin was sent to France as an ambassador for the US, he became affiliated with the French Masonic Lodges. In 1777, he entered the “Loge des Neuf Soeurs” of Paris, and in 1778 assisted in Voltaire’s initiation into this lodge: https://www.freemason.com/benjamin-fran ... ng-father/
(https://archive.is/myd4i)


There are several reasons to suspect that "hero" of the American War for Independence, Benjamin Franklin was a British double agent all along.

From the mid 1750s to the mid 1770s, Benjamin Franklin spent much time in London, meeting the English elite, and even went to meetings of Sir Francis Dashwood‘s notorious Hellfire Club. Records of membership of the Hellfire Club were burned in 1774, so it isn't certain that Franklin was also a member.
The Hellfire Club's members were known as the Knights of St. Francis of Wycombe. British Intelligence also held meetings at the same Wycombe where Hellfire came together.

Francis Dashwood was educated at Eton College where he became associated with William Pitt the Elder (whose son John Pitt, 2nd Earl of Chatham became a KG in 1790). Pitt and John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich (whose family counts many Knights of the Garter) were also accused to have been members of a Hellfire Club (that met at the George and Vulture Inn throughout the 1730s).
Francis Dashwood later became British Chancellor of the Exchequer and Postmaster General.

Toward the middle of the nineteenth century, Lord le Despencer’s illegitimate daughter, Rachel Antonina Lee, claimed that her father would often raise a toast to "Brother Benjamin of Cookham, who remained our friend and secret ally all the time he was in the enemy camp".
Rachel explained that "Brother Benjamin" was Franklin, who "sent intelligence to London by devious routes, through Ireland, by courier from France and through a number of noble personages in various country houses".

During the war, Franklin continued to correspond with his associates in England, including Lord Shelburne (KG in 1782), Thomas Walpole (whose uncle Robert Walpole became a KG in 1726), Lord Camden (which one?), Thomas Wharton and John Williams.
Comte de Vergennes' plans for war with England were frustrated because every move by the Americans in Paris was known to the English Ambassador, Lord Stormont. This wasn't very surprising because inside the US Embassy was a cell of British Intelligence, organised by the Ambassador’s chief assistant Edward Bancroft (who King George III referred to as a double agent).
For some reason Franklin refused to investigate espionage charges against Bancroft and instead brought charges against the man who had accused Bancroft.

Benjamin Franklin became part of the British Royal Society in 1756.
Franklin was also honoured by the Universities of Yale, Harvard, Oxford and Edinburgh: https://msuweb.montclair.edu/~furrg/fc/ ... nklin.html
(https://archive.is/rovCt)
The Order of the Garter rules the world: https://www.lawfulpath.com/forum/viewto ... 5549#p5549
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Re: Freemasonry and Masonic rituals - Unveiling the Secrets

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Another freemason that became a "hero" of the American revolution is George Washington (US president 1789–1797).
It isn't really secret, but it could come as quite a shock to learn that through the War of Independence, George Washington was a shareholder in the privately owned British central bank, Bank of England!

The Continental Congress selected Washington as the commander-in-chief of the armed forces. As an appointed military officer, he held an “office ... under the United States” and could not “accept of any ... emolument” from a “foreign State”.
In other words, General Washington wasn't allowed to accept a “profit, gain, or advantage” from a “foreign state-chartered ... company”, like the Bank of England: https://reformclub.blogspot.com/2019/05 ... nk-of.html
(https://archive.is/IMBQj)


George Washington became "America's first spymaster" when he directed Major Benjamin Tallmadge to form the Culper Ring to covertly collect information about the British in New York in 1778.
Maybe to help the British?!?

During mid-1780, Benedict Arnold started giving secret information to the head of British Secret Service in America John André.
After he had become a British double agent, Washington made Arnold commander of West Point even though he knew of several incidents of disloyalty by Benedict Arnold. After he was given command, on 21 September, Arnold met André to dicuss plans to take over West Point.

On 23 September 1780, André was captured by the American armed forces, who discovered the plans.
Lieutenant Colonel John Jameson sent General George Washington the plans he carried with him (written by Benedict Arnold). Because he wanted Arnold to escape he insisted on sending a warning note to Arnold, so he could escape to the British.

André was sentenced to death for espionage, but Washington tried to exchange him for Arnold with the British. André was hanged on 2 October 1780.
Maybe André was simply set up, because he had trashed Benjamin Franklin's house in Philadelphia, when it was occupied by the British. Or maybe he had found out some secrets about Franklin he shouldn't have: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Andr%C3%A9


The London-educated lawyer Joseph Reed, who was adjutant general on Washington’s staff, complained to the army’s second-ranking officer, Maj. Gen. Charles Lee, about George Washington's failings as commander in chief: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/ ... 180958786/
(https://archive.is/1fOIg)
The Order of the Garter rules the world: https://www.lawfulpath.com/forum/viewto ... 5549#p5549
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